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Praise & Admiration for Toronto Police (1903)

TORONTO POLICEMEN ARE MODELS OF POLITENESS Their Clubs Are Merely Ornamental, But They Manage to Enforce the Laws – How a Police Court Hearing is Conducted – The Finest are the Guides, Counselors and Friends of Our Canadian Neighbors – Not Like Pittsburgh. by Henry Jones Ford Pittsburgh Gazette, July 12, 1903 Above: Newpaper photo from Colonel…

Exhibition Of 1889 Only One He Missed

Ex-Alderman Edward Galley Has Been Going to Them Since the Year 1852 HOW C.N.E. HAS GROWN SINCE THE EARLY DAYS First Held in a Few Tents in Boulton’s Fields — Big Display of Patchwork Quilts from Toronto Star Weekly, September 9, 1922 By William Lewis Edmonds Toronto can boast of having at least one citizen…

Street directory of Toronto’s “Ward” — 1913

Photo: Section of the Ward, ca 1910s, from Louisa & Albert Streets at lower left, the Armouries at centre, and the old University Avenue Synagogue seen from the back (it faced onto University Ave., midway between Queen and Dundas) The neighbourhood known as “the Ward” was one of the most colourful areas in the city’s…

Toronto City Council, 1907

The illustration appeared in the Toronto Star on January 15, 1907, as the city welcomed a new city council into City Hall. The mayor was named Coatsworth. Note that there are no women councillors; however, it seems there are a few women present (note their distinctive hats) in the gallery in the background. In early…

Toronto’s Jewish ‘Unknown Soldier’ from WWI

◊ An item in the Toronto Star from 1936 explains a certain inscription on a tombstone found at the Pape Avenue Cemetery, Toronto’s oldest Jewish cemetery. George Sorblum, Toronto’s “unknown soldier,” died in 1919 but his family only learned what happened to him in 2007.   * * *  From the Toronto Star, November 7, 1936 Some…

Obit: Elazar (Louis) Rotenberg, ran steamship agency (d.1936)

From the Jewish Standard, January 1937 The most remarkable thing about the late Mr. Elazar (Louis) Rotenberg, who died on Thursday, December 31, 1936, was the note of aristocratic bearing which characterized all his life and helped to create the tone of quiet refinement for which his household is noted. Throughout his fairly long life…

A shocker: Mother & babe held at US-Canada border for two weeks

From The London Jewish Chronicle, March 20, 1931 ◊ This shocking tale from  the height of the depression focuses on a poor and desperate mother who, with a helpless infant, was caught in a bureaucratic no-man’s-land between the United States and Canada while authorities argued over which country would take her. Dorothy Cohen, a Jewish girl,…