Tag: crime & courts

Scandal: ‘kosher’ sausage is really treif (1919)

From the Canadian Jewish Chronicle, September 5, 1919 A very interesting decision was handed down last Sunday in the Jewish Court of Arbitration. The case was that of the S. Karsch Co., kosher sausage manufacturers. The company consists of two partners, Sam Karsh and Joseph Peverman. One of the partners accused the other of misappropriating…

Police Raid Matzah Factory (1909)

From the Toronto Star, November 4, 1909 ◊ This article reflects two problems sometimes faced by members of the city’s Jewish community in regard to the police. The first is selective enforcement of the law, seemingly targeting the Jews (and certainly other minorities probably even more). The second is the specific Sunday blue laws that meant…

From Post Office Manager to Prison — A Tale of the Ward

◊ The following newspaper stories tell of young Joseph Gurofsky’s rise from assessment clerk to bank manager in Toronto’s “Ward” neighbourhood where mostly “foreigners” reside — and how, one fall day, he was drawn into a violent street fight with some Italian ruffians that led to his trial and short imprisonment. Somewhat grandiosely and inaccurately, the…

20,000 gawkers swarm Bessie Starkman funeral, 1930

Prelude: Bessie (Besha) Starkman, a Jewish immigrant from Poland, married baker and driver Harry Tobins in Toronto in 1907 and gave birth to daughters Gertrude in 1909 and Lilly (Leah) in 1911. They lived at 92-1/2 Agnes (Dundas) Street in 1909 and 63 Chestnut Street in 1911. In 1912 an Italian immigrant named Rocco Perri…

My day in court; or, Every dog has his day

I am one of this city’s great silent army of working poor, and so my name is Legion. I am just one of the masses, evidently, poor and huddled, yearning to breath free; one of the anonymous faces that wash up in the courtrooms of Old City Hall each morning, charged with bylaw infractions and…

Little things that have sent Ontario criminals to the gallows

Birchall Dropped a Cigar Case, Which Was His Undoing — Jardine Talked Too Much — Charles Gibson May be Hanged Because He Wore a Peculiar Tie Pin From the Toronto Star Weekly, November 1912 “The mills of the gods grind slowly, but they grind mighty fine.” Charles Gibson, aged 20 years, has been convicted of…

Magistrate Jacob Cohen profiled in Globe, 1910

THE following feature profile of Jacob Cohen, a retired Toronto businessman who became Toronto’s first Jewish justice of the peace in 1907, appeared in the Toronto Globe of March 12, 1910. * * * SNUGLY settled in the heart of Toronto reposes a little Hebrew nation sixteen thousand strong and growing rapidly. It has its…

Policeman’s job not hazardous (1914)

From the Toronto Star Weekly, March 1914 “When constabulary duty’s to be done, A policeman’s lot is not a happy one.” The risks which a policeman constantly encounters are varied and peculiar. In Toronto, within the last few days, two dastardly assaults have been committed on constables engaged in the performance of their duties. On the…

Betting on the Decisions in Toronto’s Police Court (1914)

From the Toronto Star Weekly, February 21, 1914 Small Sums risked by Regulars in Public Seats By Leo Devaney Just the other day a man who obtained food from one of the free missions in the city of Toronto was arrested as he was about to enter a picture show. He appeared in the Police…

Farewell to the old Parliament Buildings (1902)

From the Globe, October 27, 1902 A Centre of History: Frank Yeigh Conducts a Farewell Pilgrimage through old Parliament Buildings A farewell tour of inspection of the old Parliament buildings, now in process of dissolution, was paid by the Canadian Club on Saturday afternoon under the guidance of Mr. Frank Yeigh. Probably 400 persons, including many…